" Anedonia
This photo was taken in Kushinagar, India. This is me and two Buddhist monks. One of them asks me where I’m from and if I’m buddhist.I’m from Brazil.After spending 26 hours travelling, I arrived in Malaysia. From there I went to Singapore, then to Nepal, India and Thailand. The whole trip lasted a month and I came back a completely different person. Sometimes, we take the world for granted: everything is so close nowadays, so accessible, so easy. Asia is just a day’s trip away.It isn’t. It’s a different planet. Another reality, filled with its own people, languages, every single place has a different feeling. The food. The smell. The streets, the clothes, the culture. Nothing is really translatable. Travel. Travel anywhere. You don’t have to go to Asia or Europe or Africa, but you must learn to travel. Learn to see the world with other eyes, accept different experiences and ideas, try to find interesting aspects in your own culture. I’ve met some of the most amazing human beings…I didn’t even know people could be so free. But they can. I made an Iranian friend in Malaysia and she invited me to drink, I had to refuse because my plane was leaving. A spanish musician on a plane to Nepal and his Paraguayan girlfiend, who worked as a singer in China, were sitting next to me when I talked to them. I overcame fear and shyness (What are they going to think?) It doesn’t matter when you travel. Talk. I got to know them better and we had beautiful conversations. I met and Israeli journalist sitting in a music store in Nepal. He told me how amazing Sri Lanka was. An English lady who I met at the hotel sat with me in the dark talking about relationships. The Nepali manager of the hotel told me about his job at a German industry. He speaks four languages. I met an amazing english hippie who told me about Tibet and its history with China. His friend, a girl from Hollywood, had studied cinema there and told me she knew some celebrities. “It’s like high school”, she said. A group of students from the state of Washington were on a hill enjoying the view of the Himalayas, when I noticed a bee on one of the girl’s back. I helped her get rid of it and she thanked me. “I’m allergic to bees”. I met a Japanese man in his late fifties who didn’t speak a word of english, but luckily, I knew the titles of the old japanese movies. He was moved. He hugged me and it was one of the most meaningful moments of my life. To break the language barrier, to feel that you really belong in this world. Going to the city where the Buddha was born, I met two men, one of them from Nepal and the other from Myanmar, who told me about their meditation center. The one from Myanmar told me he was a revolutionary and liked Che Guevara. “Why not?”, he said, smiling. Once, in Nepal, as I climbed a hill, I met a local woman and she pointed to my water bottle. I gave her two. She thanked me and continued to rest some more, before getting up with the pack of herbs she brought on her back. I remember thinking that moment seemed like a legend, a folk tale of a thirsty woman and a foreigner on a hill. A beautiful Nepali girl told me how hard it was for her to finish the studies. In Thailand, I met a spanish journalist who once had been to North Korea. In the same Phi Phi islands, a drunk Danish guy asked me where the beach was and I told him. He thanked me and went back to the dark. I loved sitting there watching all those people come to drink and party on that island. It was 2 A.M. and the world was quiet except for the drunks. What a beautiful moment.In Bangkok, a Dutch girl who studied photography told me she was going to keep traveling until the ran out of money. I told her I loved movies, and I named one movie from each country we talked about, but I couldn’t remember any dutch movies. When I was shopping in the streets, a crazy old French guy told me was an atheist and was looking for a funny t-shirt of Jesus. He showed me his many tattooes of Indian mantras. He had been several times to India. I gave him my Facebook, but he never added me. I learned a golden rule: when you’re interested, don’t wait for people to interact with you. Don’t expect people to talk to you if you don’t talk to them.Also in Thailand I met an amazing Russian lawyer who invited me to her home in Vladivostok. She has an eleven-year-old daughter and wants us to be married. Well, someday, who knows, right?Travelling is one of those things in the world that can’t go wrong. An experience is always valid. The most important thing to me, I think, is to be a foreigner in your own country. To be fascinated by the sound of your own language, the sights of your city. Learn to listen. Talk to people you’ve never talked to before, try the foods you never tried before. Don’t be afraid, don’t doubt. Don’t be so sure. Give meaning to your existence in this world.

This photo was taken in Kushinagar, India. This is me and two Buddhist monks. One of them asks me where I’m from and if I’m buddhist.
I’m from Brazil.
After spending 26 hours travelling, I arrived in Malaysia. From there I went to Singapore, then to Nepal, India and Thailand. The whole trip lasted a month and I came back a completely different person. Sometimes, we take the world for granted: everything is so close nowadays, so accessible, so easy. Asia is just a day’s trip away.
It isn’t. It’s a different planet. Another reality, filled with its own people, languages, every single place has a different feeling. The food. The smell. The streets, the clothes, the culture. Nothing is really translatable. Travel. Travel anywhere. You don’t have to go to Asia or Europe or Africa, but you must learn to travel. Learn to see the world with other eyes, accept different experiences and ideas, try to find interesting aspects in your own culture. I’ve met some of the most amazing human beings…I didn’t even know people could be so free. But they can. I made an Iranian friend in Malaysia and she invited me to drink, I had to refuse because my plane was leaving. A spanish musician on a plane to Nepal and his Paraguayan girlfiend, who worked as a singer in China, were sitting next to me when I talked to them. I overcame fear and shyness (What are they going to think?) It doesn’t matter when you travel. Talk. I got to know them better and we had beautiful conversations. I met and Israeli journalist sitting in a music store in Nepal. He told me how amazing Sri Lanka was. An English lady who I met at the hotel sat with me in the dark talking about relationships. The Nepali manager of the hotel told me about his job at a German industry. He speaks four languages. I met an amazing english hippie who told me about Tibet and its history with China. His friend, a girl from Hollywood, had studied cinema there and told me she knew some celebrities. “It’s like high school”, she said. A group of students from the state of Washington were on a hill enjoying the view of the Himalayas, when I noticed a bee on one of the girl’s back. I helped her get rid of it and she thanked me. “I’m allergic to bees”. I met a Japanese man in his late fifties who didn’t speak a word of english, but luckily, I knew the titles of the old japanese movies. He was moved. He hugged me and it was one of the most meaningful moments of my life. To break the language barrier, to feel that you really belong in this world. Going to the city where the Buddha was born, I met two men, one of them from Nepal and the other from Myanmar, who told me about their meditation center. The one from Myanmar told me he was a revolutionary and liked Che Guevara. “Why not?”, he said, smiling. Once, in Nepal, as I climbed a hill, I met a local woman and she pointed to my water bottle. I gave her two. She thanked me and continued to rest some more, before getting up with the pack of herbs she brought on her back. I remember thinking that moment seemed like a legend, a folk tale of a thirsty woman and a foreigner on a hill. A beautiful Nepali girl told me how hard it was for her to finish the studies. In Thailand, I met a spanish journalist who once had been to North Korea. In the same Phi Phi islands, a drunk Danish guy asked me where the beach was and I told him. He thanked me and went back to the dark. I loved sitting there watching all those people come to drink and party on that island. It was 2 A.M. and the world was quiet except for the drunks. What a beautiful moment.
In Bangkok, a Dutch girl who studied photography told me she was going to keep traveling until the ran out of money. I told her I loved movies, and I named one movie from each country we talked about, but I couldn’t remember any dutch movies. When I was shopping in the streets, a crazy old French guy told me was an atheist and was looking for a funny t-shirt of Jesus. He showed me his many tattooes of Indian mantras. He had been several times to India. I gave him my Facebook, but he never added me. I learned a golden rule: when you’re interested, don’t wait for people to interact with you. Don’t expect people to talk to you if you don’t talk to them.
Also in Thailand I met an amazing Russian lawyer who invited me to her home in Vladivostok. She has an eleven-year-old daughter and wants us to be married. Well, someday, who knows, right?
Travelling is one of those things in the world that can’t go wrong. An experience is always valid. The most important thing to me, I think, is to be a foreigner in your own country. To be fascinated by the sound of your own language, the sights of your city. Learn to listen. Talk to people you’ve never talked to before, try the foods you never tried before. Don’t be afraid, don’t doubt. Don’t be so sure. Give meaning to your existence in this world.

My Top 10 Most Beautiful Flags.

People applaud the sunset in the great brazilian film Paraísos Artificiais (2012).

People applaud the sunset in the great brazilian film Paraísos Artificiais (2012).

Acredito que, com argumentos suficientes, alguém pode elogiar ou desprezar qualquer coisa. A admiração e a crítica constroem ou destroem a expressão artística.
Eu gosto de Apocalypse Now.
E sendo um filme, é um encontro de imagem e música, forma e movimento, fala e pensamento, é um fluxo contínuo de sensações e movimentos lógicos. 
Mas sendo um bom filme, tudo isso se transforma. Isso se junta, se multiplica, se solidifica na forma de arte. Isso é arte. É criação. É a realidade aumentada, melhorada, piorada, exagerada. É insuportável ou animadora, mas sempre fascinante. E quando as coisas funcionam, a música casa com a imagem, e diante dos nossos olhos começa uma orgia de altíssimo nível. É o nascimento. É aquele sentimento de que o mundo em que eu estou se fecha, e um novo mundo se abre. Não é mais Brasil, não é mais português, não é corriqueiro nem comum. A realidade se contorce. No caso de Apocalypse Now, tudo começa com o ventilador. E quando começa a tocar This Is The End, é realmente o fim da minha realidade. E lá vem a guerra. E os olhos que olham o teto. Saigon. Merda, ainda estou em Saigon. A floresta, então, passa a fazer sentido. Não são só árvores servindo de cenário pra um filme americano, mas, porque estão ligadas à visão única de um homem único imaginado pelo filme, porque fazem parte de uma narrativa, as árvores ganham vida. E nasce o simbolismo, a alegoria, e podemos nos perguntar o que são essas árvores, e o fogo, e o rio. Aonde vai o rio, de onde vêm os helicópteros, tudo passa a fazer sentido, porque é um novo mundo. Não é um mundo particular, como nos livros. A leitura estimula a imaginação. A música é a contemplação do que sentimos ao ouvir - mas os filmes…cada filme é um mundo. Obviamente que nem todos os filmes valem a pena. Alguns mundos não merecem ser visitados. Mas os que merecem acabam por enobrecer este mundo. E quando nós voltamos, a catarse está completa. As árvores, o fogo, o rio. A destruição. Nossas angústias, somadas com a angústia da guerra, são resolvidas no fim. O bom filme é cíclico. Cria, desenvolve e destrói. E no processo, uma parte de nós mesmos é criada, desenvolvida e destruída: isso é arte. É o não-limite do cinema, na força ilimitada de Apocalypse Now.

MERCY, MERCY, MERCY

PRETTY THING

You pretty thing
Let me buy you a wedding ring
Let me hear the choir sing
Oh you pretty thing

You pretty thing
Let me walk you down the aisle
Darling, where our love is found
Oh you pretty thing

Let me kiss you gentle
Squeeze and hug you tight
Let me give all my love
The rest of my life

You pretty thing
Let me hold you by my side
And become my blushing bride
You pretty thing

Pretty thing
Let me dedicate my life
You will always be my wife
Oh you pretty thing



15 Portuguese Tips

Here are some tips for all you portuguese students. 
Well, you don’t have to be a student, but if you’re coming to the Cup, want to understand bossa nova lyrics or is just looking for cool phrases to hit on brazilian girls, these are 15 tips to make you sound less like a gringo:

Puta que o pariu! - This should be on our national flag. It literally means “whore that gave birth to it”. An american equivalent would be “Fuck me!”.
Face - You’ll sound much more natural if you ask someone’s Facebook by just saying Qual seu Face? (fay-see). 
Um minutinho Brazilians love diminutives. This means “Just a moment”, and it makes you sound polite and less formal.
Que calor da porra - “So fucking hot”, referring to the weather. An attractive person is going to be called gostoso for men and gostosa for women. 
Eu não vejo novela - When someone talks about soap operas, you say “I don’t watch soap operas”.
Nossa senhora!- Literally, “Our Lady”. It’s used for almost everything, by religious and non-religious people. It’s like “Holy shit”, but not profane.
Você vem sempre aqui? - The worst pickup line ever won’t get you anywhere. “Do you come here often?”. There’s a small chance the girl finds it funny and decides to give you a chance.
Sacanagem- This is very common. Isso é sacanagem means “This is unfair/foul play/wrong”. It can also be used to describe sexual intercourse in a vulgar way, like Eu gosto de sacanagem, “I like filthy/naughty stuff”.
Funkeiro- Someone who listens to or sings brazilian funk. It sucks, by the way.
Cara, mano, velho - “Man, dude, homie”.
Piriguete - A slut, a girl who sleeps with everybody.
Maromba - Someone who cares too much about their physical looks, and goes to the gym too often. A “culture of the gym” is unfortunately common in Brazil, meaning that there are thousand of retarded fucks who can’t even spell their names but keep saying No Pain, No Gain.
Sei lá- “Whatever”, “I don’t know”.
Que sorriso lindo! - “What a beautiful smile!”. This actually works with some girls!
É foda Foda is a vulgar word, and a favorite of angry brazilians. É foda can mean that something is either bad or good. It depends on the context. É foda isso, "This is fucked up" generally means that something is complicated or difficult. Você é foda means “You’re complicated, you don’t learn”, OR “You’re amazing, you’re awesome”. The context is up to you, but I ensure that Brazil is foda.

Poster for Synecdoche, New York.One week after Philip Seymour Hoffman’s death, I’m still deeply sad and shocked. He was one of my favorite actors. For me, he was up there with Bogart, Buster Keaton, Al Pacino, Robert de Niro and Brando. He was that good. Synecdoche, New York is one of my favorite movies of the last couple of decades. This week I watched Capote, Catching Fire and Before The Devil Knows You’re Dead, all for the first time, just to see more of Phil. I’ve already seen Boogie Nights, Happiness, The Big Lebowski, The Master, Magnolia, Almost Famous and 25th Hour.He was excellent in each and every one of them.It may be weird to say this, but I thought of him as a personal friend.Thank you, Phil.

Poster for Synecdoche, New York.


One week after Philip Seymour Hoffman’s death, I’m still deeply sad and shocked. He was one of my favorite actors. For me, he was up there with Bogart, Buster Keaton, Al Pacino, Robert de Niro and Brando. He was that good. Synecdoche, New York is one of my favorite movies of the last couple of decades. This week I watched Capote, Catching Fire and Before The Devil Knows You’re Dead, all for the first time, just to see more of Phil. I’ve already seen Boogie Nights, Happiness, The Big Lebowski, The Master, Magnolia, Almost Famous and 25th Hour.
He was excellent in each and every one of them.
It may be weird to say this, but I thought of him as a personal friend.
Thank you, Phil.

THIS IS THE HAPPIEST DAY OF MY LIFE

THIS IS THE HAPPIEST DAY OF MY LIFE

BEST MOVIES I’VE SEEN THIS YEAR

It’s that time of the year again! Gather ‘round for my list of the absolutely best movies ever made (that I watched in 2013). 
This year I watched the unhealthy amount of 160 movies. These were my favorites.

Closely Watched Trains (1966, Ostre sledované vlaky)
Fires on the Plain (1959, Nobi)
The Sacrifice (1986, Offret)
Murmur of the Heart (1971, Le souffle au coeur)
Sansho The Bailiff (1954, Sanshô dayû) GOD this one is beautiful!
My Sassy Girl (2001, Yeopgijeogin geunyeo)
Children Of Paradise (1945, Les enfants du paradisAMAZING
Three colours: Red (1994, Trois couleurs: Rouge)
Dear Zachary: A Letter to a Son About His Father (2008)
Before Sunset (2004)
Lolita (1962) Ohh yes, yes!
Searching for Sugar Man (2012)
To the Left of the Father (2001, Lavoura Arcaica)
Marketa Lazarová (1967) Fantastic
The Leopard (1963,Il gattopardo) A piece of heaven
The Earrings of Madame de… (1953, Madame de… )Better than sex
Amour (2012)
Sherlock Jr. (1924)
Mother (2009, Madeo)
The Hunt (2012, Jagten)
The Act of Killing (2012)
Crumb (1994)

And that’s that.